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Was at Il Tartufo* in Manayunk the other night, waiting near the bar after dinner when a waiter - who was not my waiter - surprised me. "How'd you like the Fettuccine Cinghiale?" she asked.

I had liked it just fine, but was curious to know how she knew what I'd eaten. I hadn't seen her near my table all evening.

"I just saw the bill for your table," she replied. "Guys always get the wild boar pasta."

Part waiter and part analyst - new competition for us market researchers?

I Look at Data From Both Sides Now

Posted by on in A Day in a (MR) Life

caddie and golferI was watching the final round of the Bridgestone Invitational and my 14 year old son came in to the room.  I told him the established narrative. After a difficult two years Tiger Woods had returned to golf, but not before firing his long time and very loyal caddie.   Most saw this as just plain nasty on Tiger's part.  

I then told him how another golfer, Adam Scott, hired the caddie and was now on the verge of winning the tournament. I summed it up by saying that justice had prevailed.

He didn't even miss a beat before asking me, "Did Adam Scott fire his caddie so that he could hire the caddie Tiger fired?"

I don't follow competitive golf closely enough to know the answer. Worse, I had not even considered that the narrative "Tiger mean/Adam good" might be a bit off.  

A good lesson for any analyst to learn.

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knowing enough to make the right decisionSometimes as researchers we get too hung up on knowing everything.   We get frustrated by interesting findings that can't be explained with the available data and this can cause us to miss important insights. I suspect that the proliferation of available data will do little to help fill in the blanks...in fact, it might make the problem worse. A simple exercise in text analytics highlights this point.

There are now an array of tools available to help quantify and understand massive amounts of text.  For example,  at one of our conferences last year, Oded Netzer of Columbia University presented an amazing tool that analyses message boards and other online forums to learn about specific markets (slides can be found at:  http://www.trchome.com/research-knowledge/conferences/437). Tools like these provide a rich and valuable source of data, but insight can also be gleaned from far more simple approaches.

Tagged in: Statistics Text Mining

mrmwsignI really enjoyed my time last week at Merlien’s Market Research in the Mobile World 2011 – a great place to meet and exchange ideas with the people and companies working to make effective mobile research a reality. We discussed the nitty-gritty of mobile survey applications, and the big picture of mobile adoption around the world. Taking it all in it’s hard to argue that mobile won’t play a major role in the future of the market research industry, both in the developed and developing worlds.

Here’s the thing, though. Most of the conversation during the conference focused on the “what” of mobile research – how to reach people, or whether or not to keep surveys short(er). Very little was said about the “so what,” even though that’s where we as research professionals can earn respect and remain relevant.

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  • Ed Olesky
    Ed Olesky says #
    Great points Mike; I agree that once we nail down some of the practical methodological issues the real point is how can we use the

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