Welcome visitor you can log in or create an account

800.275.2827

Consumer Insights. Market Innovation.

blog-page

Conferences

I attended IIeX (Insight Innovation Exchange) in June 2013 where the message was all about dramatic change coming and coming fast. A sort of “innovate or die” message. I expected CASRO’s annual conference to take almost the opposite view. After the first day I am pleased to say that while the view from CASRO is more measured, there is little doubt that change is coming.

From the opening remarks the focus has been on change. Not how to avoid it, but how to embrace it. IIeX presented the opportunity to see how new methods are being used and lots of sessions on new products and services that offer both opportunity and threat to the status quo. CASRO is less specific and focuses more about how to think differently, how to recognize opportunities and how to innovate to stay relevant. In the end, however, the message is clear…you must innovate.

This should come as no surprise to researchers. Whether you do product development as we do, or virtually any kind of research, we advise our clients on how to change to meet the demands of the market. Why then should we expect to be any different in our own business?

So, while I expected the two conferences to present distinctly different views, I am pleased to say they are presenting complementary views.   I walked away from IIeX with lots of ideas on how to apply some great new tools. Thus far I have grown in confidence that I’m on the right track and I have new ways to look at the innovation process. It has already helped me refine my thinking and caused me to want to accelerate change in my company.

We’ll see what the next two days of CASRO hold in store. Ideally I will be glad to have been at both IIeX and CASRO and have a hard time saying which one was the most valuable. One thing I can say, however, is this: while my friend Lenny Murphy has done an outstanding job leading the call for change in this industry, CASRO still outshines IIeX when it comes to food and drink.  

Hits: 5771 0 Comments

research conference may13 2013We just wrapped up another of our client conferences and it was another successful day for all concerned. This conference stood out for the level of interaction between the speakers and the audience, a testament to the speakers, their topics, and the keen interest that practitioners have in these topics.  

The first speaker was Olivier Toubia from Columbia University. Olivier is a true leader in the area of innovation research and teaches an MBA course called Customer Centric Innovation. He gave a quick round up of four important questions that he has been able to address through his research – how to motivate consumers to generate ideas, how to structure the idea generation process, how to screen and evaluate the ideas and how to find consumers who have good ideas. By taking us through a variety of studies (including surveys and experiments) he was able to answer these questions and provoke a lot of interesting thoughts from the audience.

Next up was Vicki Morwitz from New York University. She uses surveys extensively in her research and is a leader in understanding the impact that survey responses have on subsequent behavior. She was able to present evidence about the unintended effect that surveys have on respondents, something that should be of interest to all marketing research firms and indeed all marketers. In some cases surveys have a positive impact in that they increase future purchasing behavior, but said Vicki, should be used with caution as overt efforts to influence consumers do not seem to work.

Vicki’s presentation was followed by TRC’s own Michael Sosnowski who discussed the idea of doing more with less in a mobile world. He talked about the increasing numbers of survey respondents who are attempting to get at surveys using their smartphones and why we as researchers should be aware of that. He questioned the conventional wisdom that mobile phone surveys should be short and simple and showed examples of more complex choice based surveys (using TRC’s Bracket) can be conducted on mobile phones and how it provides results similar to an online survey. We may not be ready to do conjoint studies on mobile phones, he said, but neither should we artificially constrain ourselves to extremely simple data collection. Using good design and sophisticated analysis it is possible to get good quality information from mobile surveys.

Following Michael was Joydeep Srivastava from the University of Maryland an old friend of mine from my graduate school days. He is now a leading consumer behavior researcher who has done especially interesting work in the area of pricing. His specific interest is in partitioned pricing (such as charging a separate price for shipping) and he was able to enlighten the audience with the results of his experiments. For example, he was able to counter the myth that charging a separate shipping price and then providing a price discount to offset it would stave off any damage to the company. On the contrary, it actually reduced the purchase likelihood compared to not providing a discount. This, he said, was because of people’s unwillingness to pay for shipping in the first place and the explicit reminder of it with the offsetting charge.      

...

mra market research conference 2012Spent a good bit of last week at the MRA conference in San Diego. The weather was overcast and cloudy for the first couple days, a perfect metaphor for the general mood of the industry and uncertain outlook the future holds for us. But as always, I saw a lot to be optimistic about. In particular the first and second to last presentation I watched featured experience researchers who are enthusiastically embracing the opportunities that exist today.

Hal Bloom of Sage Software talked about their satisfaction research using a standard likelihood to recommend approach. They attempt to survey every customer every year and succeed in getting 20% of them to respond. This means tens of thousands of surveys with a multiple of that in terms of open ended responses. Sage makes extensive use of text recognition software to determine sentiment and help sort out who their most vocal promoters and detractors are. A great use of new technology, but what struck me even more was what they do next.

market research conference 2012Well, another conference is over, perhaps our best ever. A great roster of speakers, a room full of engaged attendees and a great location was a terrific formula for a memorable conference. Some highlights from the various sessions:

Lenny Murphy, Editor-in-Chief of the Greenbook blog opened with a wide sweep discussing the waves of changes rocking the market research world. Pulling from the GRIT survey, his discussion with emerging and established players, as well as his itinerant investigation, he was able to convincingly make the case that change in the MR industry is happening. Now. He talked about emerging technologies such as mobile, social media and text analytics and how academic expertise was a key to unlocking a future of new ideas. It was a perfect set-up for the group of academic presentations that were to follow.

market research conferenceOver the past year I’ve blogged about the things that I think will drive the future of Market Research and I’m pleased to announce that for our Frontiers of Research annual conference (May 8th, in NYC, view full agenda or register) we have assembled speakers who will drive that conversation forward. The conference will cover the full spectrum of buzz-worthy topics (Behavioral Economics, Neuroscience, Gamification, Predictive Analytics). And the focus, as always, will be on ideas presented in an easy to understand way (no math!). With speakers from four Ivy League schools, and presentations that range from poker to motion picture box office, this should be an informative and enjoyable day.

Leonard Murphy will set the table by calling on his extensive knowledge of the industry to illuminate how academia can and is driving us forward. Anyone who follows his blog knows that he is not only one of the most knowledgeable industry leaders around, but that he has a provocative view of where we are heading.

Want to know more?

Give us a few details so we can discuss possible solutions.

Please provide your Name.
Please provide a valid Email.
Please provide your Phone.
Please provide your Comments.
Enter code below : Enter code below :
Please Enter Correct Captcha code
Our Phone Number is 1-800-275-2827
 Find TRC on facebook  Follow us on twitter  Find TRC on LinkedIn

Our Clients