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Consumer Behavior

Check out the infographic below to see how others learned another language.

Presenting data in an infographic format is like speaking another language. People who didn't understand you before, now can. All of a sudden, they can so clearly see the data points you had been trying to communicate. And just like learning a new language, converting data into infographics  can be daunting - yet the benefits are endless. Mainly, they open up new perspectives. At TRC we can help you overcome this hurdle. We produce infographics as part of our project deliverables.

learning language conjoint analysis

 

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Research new food products organicFitness and health have always been important to me, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve become even more self-aware of what I eat and where my food comes from.  A key turning point was a year and a half ago when I watched the documentary “Food, Inc.” by filmmaker Robert Kenner.  After watching it I literally was on the fence for a month contemplating becoming vegan.  But alas, my love for a good piece of steak won out.  However, it did leave an imprint on where and what type of food I buy.  My fiancé is of the same mind so when he moved in we started searching out ways to buy locally sourced food and meat from animals that are treated humanely.  Many of our friends, especially those with kids, tend to be food aware as well.  My parents on the other hand, though health and wellness is important to them, think “organic” is a big grocery money scheme.  This got me thinking…who are the most food aware?  Is there an age difference?
Using our online panel of consumers I asked a series of questions to find out.  When looking at health and wellness attitudes, eating well is important to both young and old.  Where we do see differences are those 44 or younger are more motivated to improve their health and wellness and like dining at restaurants that specialize in farm-to-table.  Bob and I are huge fans of farm-to-table restaurants and have been excited by the recent addition of a few establishments near us.

 Top-2-Box: Strongly agree 44 or younger 45 or older
Improve health and wellness 70%↑ 46%
Dine at restaurants that specialize in farm-to-table 46%↑ 26%
Up arrow indicates significantly higher value at 95% confidence level.

Across the board, younger consumers are more likely to buy organic products.  I think the only time my parents buy organic is when my brother comes to town with his little ones as he and my sister-in-law insist on organic only.

 Buy Organic Always / Usually 44 or younger
45 or older
Vegetables and fruit 69%↑ 32%
Meat 58%↑ 22%
Bath and Body Care 58%↑ 20%
Cleaning Products 53%↑ 19%
Up arrow indicates significantly higher value at 95% confidence level.


Now, when asking about participation in various “green” activities (i.e., recycling, composting, and gardening) we see no difference by age.  However, younger consumers are more likely to participate in farm co-ops and raise chickens.

 Yes % 44 or younger
45 or older
Participate in Farm Co-op 19%↑ 2%
Raise Chickens 16%↑ 3%
Up arrow indicates significantly higher value at 95% confidence level.


From our research, it appears that younger consumers are more engaged in wellness activities related to food than older consumers, even though both groups believe health and wellness to be important.  Buying organic can be expensive – so the question becomes how much are people willing to pay for organic products or meat from animals that are treated humanely.  This might be a good topic for a conjoint study which would pit various product options against one another to see how price comes into play when grocery shopping.

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SolarPanel conjoint AnalysisWe marketing research types like to think of the purchase funnel in terms of brand purchase. A consumer wants to purchase a new tablet. What brands is he aware of? Which ones would he consider? Which would he ultimately purchase? And would he repeat that purchase the next time?

Some products have a more complex purchase funnel, one in which the consumer must first determine whether the purchase itself – regardless of brand – is a “fit” for him. One such case is solar home energy.

Solar is a really great idea, at least according to our intrepid research panelists. Two-thirds of them say they would be interested in installing solar panels on their home to help offset energy costs. There are a lot of different ways that consumers can make solar work for them – and conjoint analysis would be a terrific way to design optimal products for the marketplace.

But getting from “interest” to “consideration” to “purchase” in the solar arena isn’t as easy as just deciding to purchase. Anyone in the solar business will tell you there are significant hurdles, not the least of which is that a consumer needs to be free and clear to make the purchase – renters, condo owners, people with homeowners associations or strict local ordinances may be prohibited from installing them.

Even if you’re a homeowner with no limitations on how you can manage your property, there are physical factors that determine whether your home is an “ideal” candidate for solar. They vary by region and different installers have different requirements, but here’s a short list:

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This past spring we surveyed our consumer panel about the winter of 2013 – 2014. We used our proprietary message prioritization tool called BracketTM to determine that high heating bills were the worst part of enduring a challenging winter.

Energy utilities dedicate resources toward educating consumers about ways to conserve, which both increases sustainability and also keeps money in consumers’ wallets. One conservation method is to use programmable thermostats – homes and businesses can be kept cooler at night or when no one is around, and warmer when people are home (and the opposite is true in the summer). The set-it-and-forget-it nature of the program means the consumer doesn’t need to fiddle and adjust; once you decide what temperature you want on which day and at which time, the system takes over.

But we like to fiddle and adjust, and thermostats can also be controlled through apps on your PC or mobile device. This allows you to over-ride the program if you forget to re-set it while you’re on vacation, for example.

We were interested to understand consumer interest in these technologies, so we polled our panel once again and asked them what type of thermostat they used, if any, and how interested they’d be in installing a fancier type than they have now.

Nearly all of our survey participants use some type of thermostat. Half use a standard thermostat (not programmable). This number is higher among non-homeowners (61% vs. 48%). Landlords take note: consider upgrading to a programmable thermostat in your rental units.

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This past summer, much of my TV viewing was dedicated to watching the series “Downton Abbey” and “Breaking Bad” in their entirety. “Downton Abbey” continues this January, but “Breaking Bad” concluded its five-season run before I started watching it. I was concerned that I would accidentally learn Walter’s and Jesse’s fates before seeing the final episodes. My friends who had seen the series were quite accommodating. But it’s tough keeping secrets in the digital age, and unfortunately, I did learn what happened in advance of watching. Jesse’s outcome was revealed by Seth Meyers during this year’s Emmy broadcast. And Walter? Well, I guess I’m to blame, since I was stupid enough to read a New York Times article in which the first paragraph states “Warning: Contains spoilers about the new age of television.”

The article, by Emily Steel, discusses the social ramifications of revealing dramatic plot twists. She cites a study by Grant McCracken, which Netflix plans to use as the basis for a digital promotion which creates a flow chart to classify people by their propensity for spoiling. At the root of all this is an attempt to understand how people view television content in the age of time-shifting and streaming, which has critical impacts on TV’s business model.

As viewing patterns change, so does water cooler conversation. You can’t simply blurt out, “How crazy was it when Danny took out Joey last night?” You need to first establish that the episode was watched by the people in the room. But the burden seems to fall more so on the one who isn’t caught up; I fell a few episodes behind my friends watching “Sons of Anarchy” this fall – so I had to make sure that they weren’t talking about it when I was around.

But with all of this conversational jockeying going on, I needed to ask a pretty basic question: how much time must elapse before what happened in a popular TV show becomes “fair game” – no longer subject to Spoiler Alerts?

To find out, we surveyed TV viewers from our online consumer panel. We know from conducting new product development market research studies (using conjoint and Bracket) that the way a question is framed influences how respondents answer. We wanted to look at the issue from both sides, so we randomly split our sample into two groups, and posed essentially the same question to both: how many days need to pass before people can communicate freely about a show and not face criticism for spoiling it for someone who hasn’t watched it yet?  We asked each group to assume a different role: one group was told to assume that they had just watched the episode, and the other group was told to assume the episode had aired, but they hadn’t watched it yet. We upped the stakes by describing the show as the final episode of a series that they liked a lot.  

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