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Consumer Behavior

Rita’s Italian Ice is a Pennsylvania-based company that sells its icy treats through franchise locations on the East Coast and several states in the Midwest and West.

Every year on the first day of spring, Rita’s gives away full-size Italian ices to its customers. For free. No coupon or other purchase required. It’s their way of thanking their customers and launching the season (most Rita’s are only open during the spring and summer months).

Wawa, another Pennsylvania company, celebrated 50 years in business with a free coffee day in April.  

Companies are giving their products away for free! What a fantastic development for consumers! I patronize both of these businesses, and yet, on their respective free give-away days, I didn’t participate. I like water ice (Philadelphia’s term for Italian ice) and I really like coffee. So what’s the problem?

In the case of Rita’s, the franchise location near me has about 5 parking spots, which on a normal day is too few. I was concerned about the crowds. On the Wawa give-away day, I forgot about it as the day wore on. That made me wonder what other people do when they learn that retailers are giving away their products. So, having access to a web-based research panel (a huge perk of my job), I asked 485 people about it. And here are the 4 things I learned:

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In my previous post I applauded Matthew Futterman’s suggestion that two key changes to baseball’s rules will produce a shorter, faster-paced game, one that will attract younger viewers. While I may not be that young, I’m certainly on-board with speeding up the game. I believe that faster-paced play will lead to greater engagement, and greater engagement will lead to greater enjoyment.

In some sense this is similar to our position on marketing research methods. We want to engage our respondents because the more focused on the task they become, the more considered their responses will be. One of our newer tools, Bracket,TM allows respondents to prioritize a long list of items in a tournament-style approach. Bracket™has respondents make choices among items, and as the tournament progresses the choices become more relevant (and hopefully more enjoyable).

Meanwhile, back to baseball. The rule changes Futterman suggests are very simple ones:

Once batters step into the box, they shouldn't be allowed to step out. Otherwise it's a strike.

If no one is on the base, pitchers get seven seconds to throw the next pitch. Otherwise it's a ball.

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Sandy Hingston wrote an article appearing in the March 2014 Philadelphia Magazine about Milennials’ lack of interest in history, specifically as it relates to baseball (read abridged version here). Later in the article, she quotes Matthew Futterman, who posited in the Wall Street Journal that two key changes to baseball’s rules will produce a shorter, faster-paced game that will attract more youngsters. This notion didn’t sit well with Sandy Hingston.  

But it did sit well with me. Very well, in fact. I’m a Boomer like Hingston, not a Millenial, but I find myself increasingly frustrated by things that, put simply, take too long. Baseball is one of them. In fact, my TV viewing of the Phillies (go Phils!) decreased as my TV viewing of another professional sport was on the rise: golf.

Anybody who watches golf on TV, or attends an event live, will attest that players can take a very long time in between shots, which is essentially the same criticism lobbed at pitchers who take too long between throws. Slow-play in golf is a hot topic, and the golf powers-that-be are quite willing to put players “on the clock” for taking their good sweet time. So to be fair, both sports are grappling with this issue.

A first or second round of professional golf will take the better part of a day to televise. A 9-inning baseball game, in contrast, lasts around 3 hours. Given the disparity between how long each event takes, one would think that I, as someone interested in fast action, would prefer watching baseball. But that’s just not the case.

This got me thinking about an issue that we grapple with in market research: respondent tedium. Long attribute batteries of low personal relevance can tax a respondent’s patience. Even being compensated doesn’t always overcome the glaze that forms over their eyes when faced with mundane, repetitive tasks. That’s why we do our best to keep respondents engaged by having them make choices (our Bracket technique is a good example of this). In bracket, the choices become more relevant as the task progresses – not unlike how play at the end of a close game or match becomes more exciting to the viewer.

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  • Ed Olesky
    Ed Olesky says #
    Very interesting, Michele. I'll be looking forward to reading Part 2. Hope you are doing well! Maryann

Every year, the fall harvest yields tasty pumpkins used in traditional baking and the carved pumpkin has become a symbol of the autumn holidays.

In the past few years, pumpkins have spread beyond the traditional baked goods of pies, loafs and muffins and can now be tasted in just about any type of cuisine imaginable. From beverages to entrees and salads to candy and ice cream, pumpkin flavoring is enjoying its moment in the sun.

But do people really like pumpkin flavored coffees and Pumpkin Spice M&Ms? And if pumpkin is so desirable, should it be available all year round?

We polled our trusty consumer panel, and here’s what we found:

Pumpkin pie isn’t enjoyed by everybody.

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My Evening with Daniel Kahneman

Posted by on in Consumer Behavior

Okay, so it wasn’t really just the two of us – there were a few hundred others involved. Still, it was a very memorable evening that I think is worth sharing.

The day started innocently enough. I was heading out to Yale for a guest lecture in the MBA Marketing Research class taught by Jiwoong Shin as I have done for several Spring semesters now. I like this trip a lot as it allows me to catch up with many of my friends in the Yale Marketing Department. One of those is Shane Frederick and I had emailed him to see if he was around. He replied asking if I was attending Kahneman’s lecture. I had no idea that Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize winner and godfather of behavioral economics was giving a lecture there. The day was already getting better! I quickly changed my Amtrak ticket to a later time and told Shane I would come by his office so we could walk over.

My guest lecture went off very well with the students asking plenty of interesting questions. Then I had lunch with Zoe Chance who is doing some very interesting work with leading companies, applying ideas from behavioral economics. After a couple more meetings, I went to see Shane and we walked over early knowing there would be a big crowd. And we were glad we did, as the auditorium was overflowing by the time the lecture started.

Daniel Kahneman (Danny to his friends) was introduced by another notable person from Yale, Professor Robert Shiller (yes, he of the Case-Shiller Index you may have heard about during the housing crisis). Shiller talked about the widespread impact of Kahneman’s work, especially after the publication of his best seller Thinking, Fast & Slow. Trying to find Kahneman’s connections to Yale, Shiller pointed out that two of his coauthors (Shane Frederick and Nathan Novemsky, both in the marketing department) were at Yale.

And then it was time for Kahneman to speak. His humility, thoughtfulness, and eloquence came through pretty much from the first few words. He started by saying that he doesn’t do university speeches anymore since he is not actively doing any research (he is retired), but could not say no to Bob Shiller. Most of his recent speeches have been about his book, and there had been so many that as a consequence he seems to have forgotten everything else he ever did (laughter!). And that, he said, makes sense because as he points out in the book, we like things that are familiar (more laughter!).

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